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Image via SproutSocial

Image via SproutSocial

At museums, cultural institutions, and other non-profits, the social media team is responsible for supporting and marketing the programs, events, and mission of the organization. Due to the collaborative nature of museums, it is essential that all stakeholders meet regularly with the social media and marketing team. Although almost every single department could potentially contribute content and ideas to the social media team, it is the most important to meet with the curatorial, education, public programs, membership, and development departments. Each of these departments has a large stake in the museums’ success as well as different, specific audiences.

The curatorial department is the bread and butter of the museum. Without art and exhibitions, the museum would not exist. Sharing information about the museums’ collection, current and forthcoming exhibitions, and curatorial programs is the best way to get people interested in the museum.

The education and public programs department is responsible for creating programs to engage the public with the museum and its collection. These programs are usually less academically focused than the curatorial programs and try to knock down barriers to entry to engage new audiences.

The membership and development departments are responsible for fundraising efforts at the museum. Individual and corporate fundraising is essential for non-profits as public and private grants become increasingly scarcer. The membership and development departments seek to inform the donors, potential donors, and non-donors about the importance of fundraising support.

Although it may seem like there is the potential for there to be too many cooks in the kitchen, it is essential to make sure that all of these different voices are represented and the respective audiences are being served.

Ultimately, the marketing and social media team should have the final say and sign off on social media messages and campaigns, as they are responsible for staying true to the institutions overall brand.

Photo by: Sean MacEntee

Photo by: Sean MacEntee

Using social media to represent your institution requires a lot more time, energy, and strategy than one might think. Today, a poor social media presence can be more detrimental than the lack of a social media presence. It is important that your museum or cultural institution take social media seriously and plan to be professional about sharing your mission and brand.

One of the things I often heard during my time working for museums was that social media was something that could or should be a tiny part of one or more people’s jobs. Even worse, it was often suggested that social media be managed exclusively by volunteer interns. I think these suggestions were fueled by the fact that many people believed that social media was a low or no-cost marketing tool when, in fact, it has proven to be a tool that requires constant upkeep and attention to do it well.

The biggest thing for non-profits and cultural organizations to keep in mind when preparing for success on social media is not to underestimate the amount of time and energy that is required for a strategic and engaging online presence. Slapping together a half-thought-out strategy just to get some posts out may seem like it is better than nothing, but, in reality, hastiness could actually be detrimental to your brand.

I know that museums and non-profits are often strapped for cash and are forced to stretch their resources as thin as possible, but it is very important to task a full-time employee, who knows the ins and outs of the organization and mission, with managing the social media strategy and accounts. Although allocating time and money for a social media/marketing manager may seem like a poor use of funds, if the organization’s goals include expanding and engaging with a broad audience, you cannot afford not to have a bold and dynamic online presence.

Remember:
1) Allocate resources to social media management and strategy
2) Be professional
3) Bad content can be worse than no content

If you take the time, energy, and effort to put together a cohesive social media plan, your organization will only benefit from mission and brand exposure to new and captive social media audiences.